Food Photographs, the old Aspect Ratio and Your Summertime Family Reunion Photographs

May 5th, 2014

I've been working on some food shots for one of my calendar clients. With the surging interest in all things food, the company recently added several food titles to their line of calendars. After checking out the food portfolio on my website, my editor at the company was very excited to see what I would cook up for them. (sorry, I just couldn't resist)

You may be wondering what that has to do with family photographs and aspect ratio, whatever that is right? Aspect ratio is the width of an image verses the height. Cameras, computer monitors, movies.. all have specific ratios. My Nikon, like film era 35mm cameras, has a 3:2 aspect ratio. What that means in the real world is that if I want to print something I shot as a 4" x 6", it will work beautifully — everything I included in my composition will be included in the print. If though I want to make a standard 8" x 10" print, a good slice of my image will get cropped off on the long edge. The only way I can get an 8" x "something close to 10" is to go "full frame", ie have an 8" x 12" print made or to plan ahead and shoot leaving extra room on the long side that I know will get cropped off. See where this leads for your family reunion shots? If you want to make 8" x 10" prints for all of your relatives that will work with an industry standard size frame, you better shoot leaving plenty of room on the sides or you'll be cropping off Uncle Fred who was standing on the end!

For my client, their calendar formats are square (even worse than the 8" x 10" scenario). As I set up my props and food that was a huge consideration. For these shoots, I was working tethered to my laptop with each image immediately opening into Adobe Lightroom's "Development" panel. With one click it allows me to see what my file will look like with a square 1:1 crop. If I'm not 100% pleased, then I can go back and tweak the composition until I know my client will be.

Below are a few of the photographs from the shoot. For the last image, I've included the "what you see is what you get" 3:2 aspect ratio and then the cropped 1:1 version my client needs. BIG difference. By the way, calendar companies work 1 to 2 years out. These images are for some of their 2016 titles.

Kitchen In The KitchenYummy cheesecake          

 

Herbs Kitchen In the KitchenMulling spices for holiday gifting.

 

Pasta1_053sxPenne pasta with tomatoes.

 

 

Kitchen In the KitchenOlives marinating in olive oil and spices. The square crop.

 

Kitchen In the KitchenThe same image as above before cropping square.

                                                                            

 

peuterey outlet online peuterey outlet online peuterey outlet online peuterey outlet online peuterey outlet online woolrich outlet online woolrich outlet online woolrich outlet online woolrich outlet online woolrich outlet online doudoune parajumpers pas cher doudoune parajumpers pas cher doudoune parajumpers pas cher doudoune parajumpers pas cher doudoune parajumpers pas cher golden goose outlet golden goose outlet golden goose outlet golden goose outlet golden goose outlet